Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2778

οὐδὲν ἀλλ' ἤ nothing but is also used elliptically, apparently by an original suppression of a form of ποιῶ or γίγνομαι; in effect, however, the phrase has acquired a purely adverbial sense (merely). Thus, διεφθάρμεθα . . . ὑπ' ἀνδρῶ οὐδὲν ἀλλ' ἢ φενα_κίζειν δυναμένων we have been ruined by men who are able (to do nothing except deceive (i.e. able merely to deceive) I. 8.36.

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a. With the above use compare οὐδὲν ἄλλο ἤ nothing else than, used without, and with, ellipse; as οἱ μύ_ριοι ἱππεῖς οὐδὲν ἄλλο ἢ μύ_ριοί εἰσιν ἄνθρωποι your ten thousand horse are nothing more (else) than ten thousand men X. A. 3.2.18, οὐδὲν ἄλλο ἢ πόλιν τὴν ἑαυτοῦ ἀπόλειπων ἕκαστος doing nothing else than each abandoning his own city T. 2.16. So also οὐδὲν ἄλλο . . . ἤ D. 8.27. Cp. ἄλλο οὐδὲν ἤ, as in ἄλλο οὐδὲν ἢ ἐκ γῆς ἐναυμάχουν they did nothing else than conduct ( = they practically conducted) a sea-fight from the land T. 4.14. Cp. cross946, cross2652.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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