Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2738

οὐ is sometimes used where we expect μή.

a. Where οὐ stands in a clause introduced by εἰ or other words after which μή might be expected ( cross2698). Thus, ὄφρα καὶ οὐκ ἐθέλων τις ἀναγκαίῃ πολεμίζοι that every one must of necessity fight even though he would not Δ 300 (cp. cross2692 a).

b. Where οὐ goes strictly with the leading verb though it stands with the infinitive. Thus, βουλοίμην δ' ἃν οὐκ εἶναι τόδε I would fain it were not so (I should not wish that this were so) E. Med. 73, ὀμώμοκεν οὐ χαριεῖσθαι . . . ἀλλὰ δικάσειν κατὰ τοὺς νόμους he has sworn, not that he will show favour, but that he will judge according to the laws P. A. 35c (some explain this as the οὐ of direct discourse).

c. Where οὐ in a contrast goes closely with a following word or words, or stands in a partial parenthesis. Thus, κελεύων οὐκ ἐν τῇ ἐκκλησίᾳ ἀλλ' ἐν τῷ θεά_τρῳ τὴν ἀνάρρησιν γίγνεσθαι (he has violated the law) in demanding that the proclamation be made not in the Assembly but in the theatre Aes. 3.204, ὁμολογοίην ἂν ἔγωγε οὐ κατὰ τούτους εἶναι ῥήτωρ I should acknowledge that I am an orator, but not after their style P. A. 17b, ὑ_μᾶς νῦν ἀξιοῦντες οὐ ξυμμαχεῖν, ἀλλὰ ξυναδικεῖν demanding that you should be, not their allies, but their partners in wrong-doing T. 1.39.

d. When a compound negative with the infinitive repeats οὐ used with the leading verb. Thus, (ὁ νόμος) οὐκ ἐᾷ εἰσιέναι, οὗ ἂν ᾖ ὁ τετελευτηκώς, οὐδεμίαν γυναῖκα the law does not permit any women to enter where the dead may be D. 43.63.

e. When οὐδείς may be resolved into οὐ and τὶς, οὐ going with the leading verb. Thus, οὐδενὸς ( = οὔ τινος) ἁμαρτεῖν . . . δίκαιός ἐστιν there is nothing he deserves to miss Ant. 4. a. 6 ( = he does not deserve to miss anything), ἀξιῶ ἐγὼ ὧν ὀμωμόκατε παραβῆναι οὐδέν I ask that you do not break any of the conditions to which you have sworn X. H. 2.4.42 ( = οὐκ ἀξιῶ . . . παραβῆναι τι). Cp. S. Ph. 88.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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