Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2687

Verbs and other words of emotion (praise, blame, wonder, etc.) and the expression of its results are often followed by a dependent exclamatory clause with οἷος, ὅσος, ὡς, etc. Here a causal sentence would have ὅτι τοιοῦτος, ὅτι τοσοῦτος, ὅτι οὕτως. English generally introduces such clauses by considering, thinking, upon the reflection how, etc. Thus, τῶ σ' αὖ νῦν ὀίω ἀποτεισέμεν, ὅσσα μ' ἔοργας therefore I think now thou shalt in turn atone for all thou hast done unto me Φ 399, ἀπέκλα_ον . . . τὴν ἐμαυτοῦ τύχην, οἵου ἀνδρὸς ἑταίρου ἐστερημένος εἴην I bewailed my fate considering what a companion I had lost (direct = οἵου ἀνδρὸς ἑταίρου (ὄντος) ἐστέρημαι) P. Ph. 117c, μάκαρ ὦ Στρεψίαδες, αὐτός τ' ἔφυ_ς ὡς σοφὸς χοἶον τὸν υἱὸν τρέφεις oh happy Strepsiades, how wise you are yourself and what a son you have! Ar. Nub. 1206, τὸ γῆρας ὑμνοῦσιν ὅσων κακῶν σφίσιν αἴτιον they rehearse how many evils old age occasions them P. R. 329b, εὐδαίμων μοι ἁ_νὴρ ἐφαίνετο . . . ὡς ἀδεῶς καὶ γενναίως ἐτελεύτα_ the man seemed to me to be happy so fearlessly and nobly did he die P. Ph. 58e, ζηλῶ γε τῆς εὐτυχία_ς τὸν πρέσβυν, οἷ μετέστη ξηρῶν τρόπων I envy the old fellow his fortune, how (lit. whither) he has changed his arid ways Ar. Vesp. 1451.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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