Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
2576

Dependent statements, or subordinate clauses stating that something is, are expressed in various ways:

1. By an infinitive, with or without an accusative (explained in 1972 ff., 2016 ff.). Thus, νομίζω γὰρ ὑ_μᾶς ἐμοὶ εἶναι καὶ πατρίδα καὶ φίλους for I think that you are both fatherland and friends to me X. C. 1.3.6, οἶμαι εἰδέναι I think that I know P. Pr. 312c.

2. By a participle, with or without an accusative (explained in 2106 ff.). Thus, οὐ γὰρ ᾔδεσαν αὐτὸν τεθνηκότα for they did not know that he was dead X. A. 1.10.16, μέμνημαι ἀκούσα_ς I remember that I heard X. C. 1.6.6.

3. By ὅτι or ὡς (and some other conjunctions) with the indicative or optative. On this form of dependent statement see cross2577 ff., and under Indirect Discourse.

a. In any form of substantive clause the subject of the subordinate verb may be made the object of the principal verb ( cross2182).

b. A clause with ὅτι (ὡς) may precede the principal clause. Cp. cross2586.


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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