Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2575

There are four main divisions of substantive clauses.

1. Dependent Statements: subordinate clauses stating that something is; as λέγει ὡς οὐδέν ἐστιν ἀδικώτερον φήμης he says that nothing is more unjust than talk about a man's character Aes. 1.125.

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2. Dependent Clauses of will or desire: subordinate clauses denoting that something should be or should be done. These clauses have been treated under the following divisions:

a. Dependent clauses after verbs of effort ( cross2209).

b. Dependent clauses after verbs of fearing ( cross2221).

N.—On dependent voluntative clauses with the accusative and infinitive (indirect petition), see cross1991 ff.

3. Dependent Questions: subordinate clauses asking a question; both parts of the sentence together forming a statement; as ἠρώτων ὅ τι ἐστὶ τὸ πρᾶγμα I asked what the matter was X. A. 5.7.23.

4. Dependent Exclamations: subordinate clauses setting forth an exclamation; both parts of the sentence together forming a statement; as διαθεώμενος αὐτῶν ὅσην μὲν χώρα_ν καὶ οἵα_ν ἔχοιεν observing how great the extent of their territory was and how excellent its quality X. A. 3.1.19.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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