Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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GENERAL CONDITIONAL RELATIVE CLAUSES Fifth Form PRESENT GENERAL CONDITIONAL RELATIVES 2567

Present general conditional relative clauses have ἄν with the subjunctive. The main clause has the present indicative or an equivalent.

νέος δ' ἀπόλλυθ' ὅντιν' (= εἴ τινα) ἂν φιλῇ θεόςhe dieth young, whome'er a god doth loveStob. Flor. 120.13, οὓς (= εἴ τινας) ἂν ὁοᾷ φιλοκινδύ_νως ἔχοντας πρὸς τοὺς πολεμίους, τι_μᾷ whomever he sees zealous of danger in the face of the enemy, these he honours X. H. 6.1.6, γαμοῦσί τε ὁπόθεν ἂν βούλωνται, ἐκδιδόωσί τε εἰς οὓς ἂν ἐθέλωσι they both get a wife from whatever family they please and give their daughters in marriage to whomsoever they choose P. R. 613d, πατρὶς γάρ ἐστι πᾶσ' ἵν' ἂν πρά_ττῃ τις εὖ for every land is a man's own country wheresoever he fares well Ar. Plut. 1151.

a. Gnomic aorist in the main clause: ὅς κε θεοῖς ἐπιπείθηται, μάλα τ' ἔκλυον αὐτοῦ whoever obeys the gods, him they most do hear A 218.

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b. The subjunctive without ἄν (κέ) is usual in Homer and occurs occasionally in Attic and lyric poetry. Thus, ἀνθρώπους ἐφορᾷ καὶ τί_νυται ὅς τις ἁμάρτῃ he watches over men and punishes whoever transgresses ν 214, τῶν δὲ πημονῶν μάλιστα λυ_ποῦσ' αἳ φανῶσ' αὐθαίρετοι but those griefs pain the most which are seen to be self-sought S. O. T. 1231. Cases of the sort appear in Hdt., but are very rare in Attic prose, e.g. T. 4.18. The subjunctive without ἄν (κέ) is much commoner in Homer than in the corresponding clauses with εἰ ( cross2339).

c. The apodosis here usually expresses a general truth, less often iterative action. In 2568 the apodosis refers to iterative action, usually on the part of designated individuals.

Sixth Form PAST GENERAL CONDITIONAL RELATIVES 2568

Past general conditional relative clauses have the optative. The main clause has the imperfect or an equivalent.

ἀεὶ πρὸς ᾧ (= εἰ πρός τινι) εἴη ἔργῳ, τοῦτο ἔπρα_ττεν whatever work he was engaged in, that he always performed X. H. 4.8.22, ἔπρα_ττεν ἃ δόξειεν αὐτῷ he always did whatever he pleased D. 18.235, πάντας . . . ὅσους λάβοιεν διέφθειρον they used to destroy as many as they captured T. 2.67, ἐθήρα_ ὅπου περ ἐπιτυγχάνοιεν θηρίοις he used to hunt wherever they fell in with large game X. C. 3.3.5, ἀνέκραγον . . . ἱκετεύουσαι πάντας ὅτῳ ἐντυγχάνοιεν μὴ φεύγειν they screamed out, entreating all they met not to flee X. C. 3.3.67.

a. An iterative tense with ἄν in the main clause: ὅπῃ μέλλοι ἀ_ριστοποιεῖσθαι τὸ στράτευμα . . ., ἐπανήγαγεν ἄν τὸ κέρας, when the squadron was about to take breakfast, he would draw back the wing X. H. 6.2.28.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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