Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect

2559

The future indicative is especially common when the main clause contains an idea of ability, capacity, or characteristic, and the relative clause denotes what is to be expected of the subject.

-- 576 --

ἱκανοί ἐσμεν . . . ὑ_μῖν πέμψαι ναῦς τε καὶ ἄνδρας οἵτινες συμμαχοῦνταί τε καὶ τὴν ὁδὸν ἡγήσονται (cp. ὥστε συμμάχεσθαι) we are able to send you ships and men who will fight with you and direct your journey X. A. 5.4.10, οὔτε πλοῖα ἔστι τὰ ἀπάξοντα οὔτε σῖτος ᾧ θρεψόμεθα μένοντες we have neither ships to convey us away nor provisions to feed us while we remain 6. 5. 20, δεῖταί τινος ὅστις αὐτὸν ὀνήσει he needs some one to improve him P. Eu. 306d, (ἔδει) ψήφισμα νι_κῆσαι τοιοῦτο δι' οὗ Φωκεῖς ἀπολοῦνται a bill had to be passed of such a character as to destroy the Phocians D. 19.43.

Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic