Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2542

An attributive adjective, or an attributive genitive belonging to a substantive standing in the main clause, may be placed either in the relative clause (if either is emphatic) or in the main clause. Two adjectives may be divided between the two clauses. The substantives may remain in the main clause or be transferred to the relative clause. Thus, τὸ τείχισμα δ ἦν αὐτόθι τῶν Συρα_κοσίων αἱροῦσι they captured the fort of the Syracusans which was there T. 7.43, ὧν ἐγὼ ἤθελον τούτῳ ταύτην ἥτις εἴη μεγίστη πίστις δοῦναι of which I was willing to offer to the plaintiff the assurance that was most solemn D. 52.12, ἐπιδεῖξαι . . . τὴν δικαία_ν ἥτις ἐστὶν ἀπολογία_ to show what the fair line of defence is 19. 203, ἔφρι_ξεν δὲ μάχη . . . ἐγχείῃσιν μακρῇς, ἃ_ς εἶχον ταμεσίχροας and the battle bristled with the long spears, the flesh-piercing spears, which they grasped N 339.

a. From the transference of superlatives to the relative clause arise such expressions as ἤγαγον συμμάχους ὁπόσους πλείστους ἐδυνάμην ( cross1087). Similarly ὡς τάχιστα (scil. δύνασαι or the like) as soon as, as soon as possible, ἐπεὶ (ὅτε) τάχιστα as soon as.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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