Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2506

In general when the relative clause has the indicative, the antecedent is either definite (negative οὐ) or indefinite (negative μή). When the relative clause has the subjunctive with ἄν or the optative (not in a wish), the antecedent is indefinite (negative μή).

DEFINITE: ταῦτα ἃ βούλεται πρά_ττει he does what he wants (i.e. the particular thing he wants to do). Negative ταῦτα ἃ οὐ βούλεται πρά_ττει.

INDEFINITE: ταῦτα ἅτινα βούλεται πρά_ττει he does whatever he wants (i.e. if he wants to do anything, he does it); negative ταῦτα ἅτινα μὴ βούλεται πρά_ττει. So ταῦτα ἅτινα ἂν βούληται πρά_ττει whatever he wants to do, that he always does, ταῦτα ἅτινα βούλοιτο ἔπρα_ττε whatever he wanted to do, that he always did, ταῦτα ἅτινα ἂν βούληται πρά_ξει whatever he wants to do, that he will do, ταῦτα ἅτινα βούλοιτο, πρά_ττοι ἄν whatever he might want to do, that he would (will) do. In the last four sentences the negative of the relative clause is μή.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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