Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2494

(sometimes ) at the beginning of a sentence may have the force of as to what (cp. quod), suggesting the matter to which it pertains.

δ δ' ἐζήλωσας ἡμᾶς, ὡς τοὺς μὲν φίλους . . . εὖ ποιεῖν δυνάμεθα . . ., οὐδὲ ταῦθ' οὕτως ἔχει as to what excited your envy of us—that we are able to benefit our friends—not even is this as you suppose X. Hi. 6.12. The postponed antecedent may be omitted (X. A. 6.1.29).

a. An introductory relative clause with may stand in apposition to an entire clause that follows. Thus, ὅ πάντων θαυμαστότατον, Σωκράτη μεθύοντα οὐδεὶς πώποτε ἑώρα_κεν ἀνθρώπων what is most wonderful, no one whatsoever ever saw Socrates drunk P. S. 220a. (So with an infinitive, I. 14.18.) The main clause, following such a relative clause, may be introduced by ὅτι or γάρ. Thus, δ μὲν πάντων θαυμαστότατον ἀκοῦσαι, ὅτι ἓν ἕκαστον ὧν ἐπῃνέσαμεν ἀπόλλυ_σι τὴν ψυ_χήν what is most wonderful of all to hear, (that) each one of the things we approved ruins the soul P. R. 491b. Cp. cross994, cross995.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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