Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2483

ὡς is common in Homer with the subjunctive (without ἄν) depending on the verb of the introductory clause, which is usually past. The simile may begin with ὡς or with a demonstrative (οἱ or τούς) after which ὥς τε is placed. Thus, ὡς δὲ λέων μήλοισιν ἀσημάντοισιν ἐπελθών . . . κακὰ φρονέων ἐνορούσῃ, ὣς μὲν Θρήικας ἄνδρας ἐπῴχετο Τυ_δέος υἱός and as a lion, coming on flocks without a shepherd, with evil purpose leaps upon them, so the son of Tydeus attacked the men of Thrace K 485, οἱ δ', ὥς τ' αἰγυπιοὶ . . . πέτρῃ ἐφ' ὑψηλῇ μεγάλα κλάζοντε μάχωνται, ὣς οἱ κεκλήγοντες ἐπ' ἀλλήλοισιν ὄρουσαν and they, like vultures who contend with loud screams on a lofty cliff, even so they rushed screaming against each other II 429. After the subjunctive with ὡς or ὡς ὅτε an independent indicative may follow (M 167, II cross296).

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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