Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2414

In temporal sentences of indefinite frequency the temporal clause has the optative when the principal clause has the imperfect or any other tense denoting a past customary or repeated action.

ἐθήρευεν ἀπὸ ἵππου ὁπότε γυμνάσαι βούλοιτο ἑαυτόν he was wont to hunt on horseback, whenever he wanted to exercise himself X. A. 1.2.7, ὁπότε ὥρα_ εἴη ἀ_ρίστου, ἀνέμενεν αὐτοὺς ἔστε ἐμφάγοιέν τι whenever it was breakfast time, he used to wait until they had eaten something X. C. 8.1.44, περιεμένομεν ἑκάστοτε ἕως ἀνοιχθείη τὸ δεσμωτήριον· ἐπειδὴ δὲ ἀνοιχθείη, εἰσῇμεν we used to wait about on each occasion until the prison was opened; but when (ever) it was opened, we used to go in P. Ph. 59d. Observe that ἀνοιχθείη marks a repeated past action (until it was regularly opened) and represents the thought of the subject (until it should be opened, cf. 2420; i.e. direct = ἕως ἂν ἀνοιχθῇ).

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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