Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2352

Omission of the Apodosis.—a. When the conclusion is it is well (καλῶς ἔχει) or the like, it is often omitted. So often when the second of alternative opposing suppositions is expressed by εἰ δὲ μή ( cross2346 d, N. 3). Cp. “yet now, if thou wilt forgive this sin, —: and if not, blot me . . . out of thy book” (Exodus 32. cross32).

b. When we should introduce the conclusion by know that or I tell you: εἰ καὶ οἴει με ἀδικοῦντά τι ἄγεσθαι, οὔτε ἔπαιον οὐδένα οὔτε ἔβαλλον if you possibly think that I was taken for some wrong-doing, know that I neither struck nor hit any one X. A. 6.6.27. Here the apodosis might be introduced by σκέψασθε, ἐνθυ_μήθητε, etc.

c. Sometimes when the protasis is merely parenthetical: ὁ χρυ_σός, εἰ βούλοιο τἀ_ληθῆ λέγειν, ἔκτεινε τὸν ἐμὸν παῖδα it was the gold—wouldst thou only tell the truth—that slew my child E. Hec. 1206.

d. In passionate speech for rhetorical effect (aposiopēsis, cross3015): εἴ περ γάρ κ' ἐθέλῃσιν Ὀλύμπιος ἀστεροπητὴς ἐξ ἑδέων στυφελίξαι· ὁ γὰρ πολὺ φέρτατός ἐστιν for if indeed the Olympian lord of the lightning will to thrust us out from our habitations, thrust us he will; for he is by far the most powerful A 581.

e. There is properly no omission of an apodosis after clauses with εἰ, εἰ γάρ, εἴθε, etc., in wishes (see cross1816). In such clauses it is often possible to find an apodosis in an appended final clause: ποτανὰ_ν εἴ μέ τις θεῶν κτίσαι, διπόταμον ἵνα πόλιν μόλω if only some one of the gods were to make me winged so that I might come to the city of twin rivers! E. Supp. 621.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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