Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2208

Connection of Final with Object Clauses.—(1) Final clauses proper denote a purpose to accomplish or avert a result, which purpose is set forth in a definite action. (2) Object clauses after verbs of effort consider means to accomplish or avert a result; the action of the subordinate clause is the object purposed. Such clauses are incomplete final clauses, because, though the purpose is expressed, the action taken to effect the purpose is not expressed. (3) Object clauses after verbs of fearing deprecate an undesired result or express fear that a desired result may not be accomplished. According to the form of expression employed, the construction of these three kinds of clauses may differ in varying degree or be identical. Thus compare these usages of Attic prose:

(1) παρακαλεῖ ἰ_α_τρὸν ὅπως μὴ ἀποθάνῃ (common)

παρακαλεῖ ἰ_α_τρὸν ὅπως μὴ ἀποθανεῖται (occasionally)

παρακαλεῖ ἰ_α_τρὸν μὴ ἀποθάνῃ (rare)

he summons a physician in order that he may not die.

(2) ἐπιμελεῖται ὅπως μὴ ἀποθανεῖται (common)

ἐπιμελεῖται ὅπως μὴ ἀποθάνῃ (occasionally)

he takes care that he shall not die.

ὅρα_ μὴ ἀποθάνῃς (occasionally) see to it that you do not die.

(3) φοβεῖται μὴ ἀποθάνῃ (common)

φοβεῖται ὅπως μὴ ἀποθάνῃ (occasionally)

φοβεῖται ὅπως μὴ ἀποθανεῖται (occasionally)

he is afraid lest he die.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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