Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect

2201

ὅπως with the subjunctive sometimes takes ἄν in positive clauses.

τοῦτ' αὐτὸ νῦν δίδασχ', ὅπως ἂν ἐκμάθω tell me now this very thing, that I may learn S. O. C. 575, ἄξεις ἡμᾶς ὅπως ἂν εἰδῶμεν you will guide us in order that we may know X. C. 5.2.21.

a. ὡς and ὄφρα with ἄν or κέ occur in poetry, especially in Homer. ὡς ἄν (first in Aeschylus) is very rare in Attic prose, but occurs eight times in Xenophon; as ὡς δ' ἂν μάθῃς . . ., ἀντάκουσον but that you may learn, hear me in turn X. A. 2.5.16. This use must not be confused with ὡς ἄν in conditional relative clauses ( cross2565).—ὅπως ἄν is more common than simple ὅπως in Aristophanes and Plato, far less common in Xenophon. It is regular in official and legal language. —ἵνα ἄν is not final, but local (wherever, cross2567). The original meaning of ἵνα was local and denoted the end to be reached.

b. ἄν (κέ) does not appreciably affect the meaning. Originally these particles seem to have had a limiting and conditional force ( cross1762): ὡς ἄν in whatever way, that so (cp. so = in order that so) as in “Teach me to die that so I may Rise glorious at the awful day” (Bishop Ken), and cp. ὡς with ὅτῳ τρόπῳ in ἱ_κόμην τὸ Πυ_θικὸν μαντεῖον, ὡς μάθοιμ' ὅτῳ τρόπῳ πατρὶ δίκα_ς ἀροίμην I came to the Pythian shrine that I might learn in what way I might avenge my father S. El. 33. With ὅπως ἄν cp. ἐά_ν πως. Both ὅπως and ὡς were originally relative adverbs denoting manner (how, cp. cross2578), but when they became conjunctions (in order that), their limitation by ἄν ceased to be felt.

Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic