Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2186

Assimilation to the Optative.—When an optative of the principal clause refers to future time (potential optative and optative of wish), the subordinate clause takes the optative by assimilation in the following cases.

a. Conditional relative clauses (regularly): πῶς γὰρ ἄν ( cross1832) τις, ἅ γε μὴ ἐπίσταιτο, ταῦτα σοφὸς εἴη; for how could any one be wise in that which he does not know? X. M. 4.6.7, τίς μι_σεῖν δύναιτ' ἄν ὑφ' οὗ εἰδείη καλός τε καὶ ἀγαθὸς νομιζόμενος; who could hate one by whom he knew that he was regarded as both beautiful and good? X. S. 8. 17, ἔρδοι τις ἣν ἕκαστος εἰδείη τέχνην would that every man would practise the craft that he understood Ar. Vesp. 1431, τίς ἂν . . . μόλοι ( cross1832), ὅστις διαγγείλειε τἀ_μ' εἴσω κακά would that some one would come to report within my tale of woe E. Hel. 435.

N. 1.—If the relative has a definite antecedent, assimilation does not take place; but not all relative clauses with an indefinite antecedent are assimilated. Cp. ὥσπερ ἂν ὑ_μῶν ἕκαστος αἰσχυνθείη τὴν τάξιν λιπεῖν ἣν ἂν ταχθῇ ἐν τῷ πολέμῳ as each one of you would be ashamed to leave the post to which he may be appointed in war Aes. 3.7.

N. 2.—A relative clause depending on an infinitive rarely takes the optative: ἀλλὰ τοῦ μὲν αὐτὸν λέγειν ἃ μὴ σαφῶς εἰδείη εἵργεσθαι δεῖ one should abstain from saying oneself what one does not know for certain X. C. 1.6.19. (See cross2573.)

b. Temporal clauses (regularly): τεθναίην, ὅτε μοι μηκέτι ταῦτα μέλοι may I

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die when these things no longer delight me Mimnermus 1. 2, ὁ μὲν ἑκὼν πεινῶν φάγοι ἂν ὁπότε βούλοιτο he who starves of his own free will can eat whenever he wishes X. M. 2.1.18, εἰ δὲ πάνυ σπουδάζοι φαγεῖν, εἴποιμ' ἂν ὅτι παρὰ ταῖς γυναιξίν ἐστιν, ἕως παρατείναιμι τοῦτον κτλ. but if he was very desirous of eating, I would tell him thathe was with the womenuntil I had tortured him, etc. X. C. 1.3.11, ὄλοιο μήπω, πρὶν μάθοιμι perish not yet . . . until I learn S. Ph. 961. But οὐκ ἂν ἀπέλθοιμι πρὶν ἂν παντάπα_σιν ἡ ἀγορὰ_ λυθῇ I shall not be leaving until the gathering in the market-place is quite dispersed X. O. 12.1.

c. Final and object clauses (rarely in prose, but occasionally after an optative of wish in poetry): πειρῴμην (ἂν) μὴ πρόσω ὑ_μῶν εἶναι, ἵνα, εἴ που καιρὸς εἴη, ἐπιφανείην I will try to keep not far away from you, in order that, if there should be any occasion, I may show myself X. C. 2.4.17 (and five other cases in Xen.); ἔλθοι ὅπως γένοιτο τῶνδ' ἐμοὶ λυτήριος may she come to prove my liberator from this affliction A. Eum. 297. Ordinarily the subjunctive or future indicative is retained, as ὀκνοίην ἂν εἰς τὰ πλοῖα ἐμβαίνειν ἃ Κῦρος ἡμῖν δοίη μὴ ἡμᾶς . . . καταδύ_σῃ I should hesitate to embark on the vessels which Cyrus might give us lest he sink us X. A. 1.3.17, τεθναίην, δίκην ἐπιθεὶς τῷ ἀδικοῦντι, ἵνα μὴ ἐνθάδε μένω καταγέλαστος let me die, when I have punished him who has done me wrong, that I may not remain here a laughing-stock P. A. 28d.

d. Indirect questions, when the direct question was a deliberative subjunctive: οὐκ ἂν ἔχοις ἐξελθὼν ὅ τι χρῷο σαυτῷ if you should escape, you would not know what to do with yourself P. Cr. 45b ( = τί χρῶμαι;). But when a direct question or a direct quotation stood in the indicative, that mood is retained, as εἰ ἀποδειχθείη τίνας χρὴ ἡγεῖσθαι τοῦ πλαισίου if it should be settled who must lead the square X. A. 3.2.36.

e. Very rarely in relative clauses of purpose (P. R. 578e possibly); after ὥστε (X. C. 5.5.30), and in dependent statements with ὅτι or ὡς (X. C. 3.1.28).

f. Assimilation and non-assimilation may occur in the same sentence (E. Bacch. 1384 ff.)

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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