Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2181

A verb common to two clauses is generally placed in one clause and omitted from the other (so especially in comparative and relative clauses).

ἥπερ (τύχη) ἀεὶ βέλτι_ον (scil. ἐπιμελεῖται) ἢ ἡμεῖς ἡμῶν αὐτῶν ἐπιμελούμεθα fortune, which always cares better for us than we for ourselves D. 4.12. Also as in English: ὅ τι δὲ μέλλετε (πρά_σσειν), . . . εὐθὺς . . . πρά_σσετε but whatever you intend, do it at once T. 7.15. In comparative clauses with οὐχ ὥσπερ (or ὡς) the main and the subordinate clause are sometimes compressed, the predicate of the clause with οὐχ being supplied from the ὥσπερ clause, which is made independent; as οὐχ (οὐδὲν ἂν ἐγίγνετο) ὥσπερ νῦν τούτων οὐδὲν γίγνεται περὶ αὐτόν it would not be as now, when none of these things is done for him P. S. 189c.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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