Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

2172

Homer often places two thoughts in juxtaposition without any regard for logical connection. This is especially common with δέ, τέ, καί, αὐτάρ, ἀλλά. Thus, πολὺς δ' ὀρυμαγδὸς ἐπ' αὐτῷ ἀνδρῶν ἠδὲ κυνῶν, ἀπό τέ σφισιν (for οἶς) ὕπνος ὄλωλεν and there is loud clamour around him of men and of dogs, and sleep is gone from them Κ 185.

a. So also in clauses preceded by a relative word; as εἷος ὁ ταῦθ' ὥρμαινε . . ., ἐκ δ' Ἑλένη θαλάμοιο . . . ἤλυθεν while he was pondering on this, (but) Helen came forth from her chamber δ 120, ὅς κε θεοῖς ἐπιπείθηται, μάλα τ' ἔκλυον αὐτοῦ whoever obeys the gods, (and) him they hear Α 218.

b. This use appears even in Attic prose; as οἰκοσι δ' ἐν μιᾷ τῶν νήσων οὐ

-- 487 --

μεγάλῃ, καλεῖται δὲ (for ἣ καλεῖται) Λιπάρα_ they dwell in one of the islands that is not large, and it (which) is called Lipara T. 3.88. Cp. also 2837.

Previous Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic