Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2169

In many cases parataxis is a common form of expression

-- 486 --

not only in the earlier language of Homer, but also in Attic prose and poetry.

So frequently in Attic prose with καί, τὲ . . . καί, ἅμα . . . καί, εὐθὺς . . . καί, and with δέ meaning for. Thus, ἤδη δὲ ἦν ὀψὲ . . . καὶ οἱ Κορίνθιοι πρύμναν ἐκρούοντο it was already late and (for when) the Corinthians started to row astern T. 1.50, καὶ ἤδη τε ἦν περὶ πλήθουσαν ἀγορὰ_ν καὶ ἔρχονται . . . κήρυ_κες and it was already about the time when the market-place fills and ( = when) heralds arrived X. A. 2.1.7, καὶ ἅμα ταῦτ' ἔλεγε καὶ ἀπῄει and as soon as he said this, he departed X. H. 7.1.28, ἐπίστασθε μόνοι τῶν Ἑλλήνων τοὺς ἀγαθοὺς ἄνδρας τι_μᾶν· εὑρήσετε δὲ . . . παρ' ὑ_μῖν στρατηγοὺς ἀγαθοὺς (ἀνακειμένους) you alone among the Greeks know how to honour men of merit; for you will find statues of brave generals set up among you Lyc. 51. Cp. σκέψασθε δέ T. 1.143.

a. Temporal conjunctions, as ἡνίκα, are rarely used to introduce such clauses, which often indicate a sudden or decisive occurrence or simultaneous action.

b. Thucydides is especially fond of καί or τέ to coördinate two ideas, one of which is subordinate to the other.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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