Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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991

Apposition to a Sentence.—A noun in the nominative or accusative may stand in apposition to the action expressed by a whole sentence or by some part of it.

a. The appositive is nominative when a nominative precedes: ἐμέθυον· ἱκανὴ πρόφασις I was tipsy, a sufficient excuse Philemon (Com. frag. 2. cross531).

b. The appositive is accusative, and states a reason, result, intention, effect, or the like: ῥί_ψει ἀπὸ πύργου, λυγρὸν ὄλεθρον will hurl thee from the battlement, a grievous death Ω 735, Ἑλένην κτάνωμεν, Μενέλεῳ λύ_πην πικρά_ν let us slay Helen and thus cause a sore grief to Menelaus E. Or. 1105, εὐδαιμονοίης, μισθὸν ἡδίστων λόγων blest be thou—a return for thy most welcome tidings E. El. 231.

N.—The appositive accusative is often cognate ( cross1563 f.): ὁρᾷς Εὐρυσθέα_, ἄελπτον ὄψιν thou beholdest Eurystheus, an unexpected sight E. Heracl. 930.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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