Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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986

Attributive Apposition.—A substantive may be used as an attributive to another substantive. This is common with substantives denoting occupation, condition , or age (usually with ἀνήρ, ἄνθρωπος, γυνή): ἀνὴρ ῥήτωρ a public speaker, ἀνὴρ τύραννος a despot, πρεσβῦται ἄνθρωποι old men, γραῦς γυνή an old woman. So also πελτασταὶ Θρᾷκες Thracian targeteers X. A. 1.2.9, ὄλεθρος Μακεδών a scoundrel of a Macedonian D. 9.31, Ἕλλην (for Ἑλληνικός), as οἱ Ἕλληνες πελτασταί the Greek targeteers X. A. 6.5.26.

a. In standard prose Ἕλλην is used as an adjective only of persons (in poetry also of things).

b. The addition of ἀνήρ often implies respect: ἄνδρες στρατιῶται fellow soldiers X. A. 1.3.3, ὦ ἄνδρες δικασταί jurymen, gentlemen of the jury D. 27.1. (Cp. foemen.) The addition of ἄνθρωπος often implies contempt: ἄνθρωπος γόης a juggling fellow Aes. 2.153.

c. Many of the substantives thus qualified by an attributive substantive were originally participles, as γέρων ἀνήρ an old man P. Lys. 223b.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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