Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect

2120

ὡς is often used with a participle in indirect discourse to mark the mental attitude of the subject of the main verb or of some other person mentioned prominently in the sentence (cp. cross2086); sometimes, to denote emphasis, when that mental attitude is already clearly marked.

ὡς μηδὲν εἰδότ' ἴσθι με be assured that I know nothing (lit. understand that you are to assume that I know nothing) S. Ph. 253, δῆλος ἦν Κῦρος ὡς σπεύδων Cyrus was plainly bent on haste (Cyrus showed that it was his intention to make haste) X. A. 1.5.9.

Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic