Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2016

The infinitive is used as the object of verbs of saying and thinking. Such infinitives denote both time and stage of action (cp. cross1866).

a. The finite verb of a sentence placed in dependence on a verb of saying or thinking that requires the infinitive, becomes infinitive, which infinitive stands in the relation of a substantive as subject or object of the leading verb. Commonly as object: thus, Κῦρος νι_κᾷ Cyrus is victorious, when made the object of φησί he says, becomes a part of a new sentence φησὶ Κῦρον νι_κᾶν, in which Κῦρον νικᾶν is the object of φησί. As subject, when the verb of saying is passive: thus, in λέγεται Κῦρον νι_κᾶν, the last two words form the subject of λέγεται.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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