Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2007

The infinitive, with or without ὥστε or ὡς, may be used with than after comparatives, depending on an (implied) idea of ability or inability. ἢ ὥστε is more common than or ἢ ὡς. Cp. cross2264.

τὸ γὰρ νόσημα μεῖζον ἢ φέρειν for the disease is too great to be borne S. O. T. 1293, φοβοῦμαι μή τι μεῖζον ἢ ὥστε φέρειν δύνασθαι κακὸν τῇ πόλει συμβῇ I fear lest some calamity befall the State greater than it can bear X. M. 3.5.17, βραχύτερα ἢ ὡς ἐξικνεῖσθαι too short to reach X. A. 3.3.7.

a. The force of ἢ ὥστε may be expressed by the genitive; as, κρεῖσσον λόγου (T. 2.50) = κρεῖσσον ἢ ὥστε λέγεσθαι. Cp. cross1077.

b. Words implying a comparison may take the infinitive with ὥστε or ὡς ( cross1063).

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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