Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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2000

The infinitive follows many verbs, especially such as denote ability, fitness, necessity, etc. (and their opposites).

οὐκέτι ἐδύνατο . . . βιοτεύειν he was no longer able to live T. 1.130, νεῖν ἐπιστάμενος knowing how to swim X. A. 5.7.25, πεφύ_κα_σί τε ἅπαντες . . . ἁμαρτάνειν and all men are by nature prone to err T. 3.45, μανθάνουσιν ἄρχειν τε καὶ ἄρχεσθαι they learn how to govern and be governed X. A. 1.9.4; also after the impersonals of 1985.

a. ἔχω I can is derived from the meaning I have especially with a verb of saying. Thus, Διὸς πλα_γὰ_ν ἔχουσιν εἰπεῖν they can proclaim a stroke of Zeus A. Ag. 367.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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