Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1998

The present and aorist infinitive (both timeless) are the usual tenses of the infinitive after verbs of will or desire (see cross1869). The perfect is rare; as εἶπον τὴν θύρα_ν κεκλεῖσθαι ( cross1997). δοκῶ and δοκῶ μοι signifying I have a mind to or I am determined to take the present or aorist like δοκεῖ· τὸν ὄνον ἐξάγειν δοκῶ I have a mind to bring out the ass Ar. Vesp. 177, ἐγὼ οὖν μοι δοκῶ . . . ὑφηγήσασθαι κτλ. now I have a mind to show, etc. P. Eu. 288c. Cp. cross1983 a. When it is clearly denoted that the action resolved on is to follow without delay the future is used; as in ἀλλά μοι δοκῶ . . . οὐ πείσεσθαι αὐτῷ but I am determined that I will not accept his opinion P. Th. 183d.

a. Some verbs, as κελεύω, which might be held to introduce indirect discourse, are classed under verbs of will or desire, because, like these verbs, they do not regularly take the future infinitive; and because, unlike verbs of saying and thinking (which admit all the tenses of the infinitive) they introduce infinitives which do not show differences of time. The future infinitive does not express a command. For a few cases of the future after verbs of will or desire, see cross1869.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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