Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1967

The infinitive is like a verb herein:

-- 438 --

a. It shows the distinctions of voice and tense (but not those of number and person). Having tenses, it can express different stages of action (action simply occurring, continuing, or finished); whereas the corresponding substantive sets forth the abstract idea without these distinctions. Contrast ποιεῖν, ποιήσειν, ποιῆσαι, πεποιηκέναι with ποίησις making.

b. It can have a subject before it and a predicate after it, and it can have an object in the genitive, dative, or accusative like the corresponding finite verb. Infinitives scarcely ever stand in the subjective genitive; and the object of an infinitive never stands in the objective genitive.

c. It is modified by adverbs, not by adjectives.

d. It may take ἄν and with that particle represent ἄν with the indicative ( cross1784 ff.) or ἄν with the optative ( cross1824).

e. It forms clauses of result with ὥστε, and temporal clauses with πρίν, etc.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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