Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1869

Verbs of will or desire ( cross1991) regularly take the present or aorist infinitive not in indirect discourse; but in some cases we find the future infinitive by assimilation to indirect discourse through the analogy of verbs of promising, etc. ( cross1868). So with βούλομαι, ἐθέλω wish, λέγω meaning command, δέομαι ask, ἐφί_εμαι desire and some others (even δύναμαι am able) that have a future action as their object. Thus, ἐφι_έμενοι ἄρξειν being desirous to gain control T. 6.6, ἀδύνατοι ἐπιμελεῖς ἔσεσθαι unable to be careful X. O. 12.12. διανοοῦμαι may follow the analogy of μέλλω ( cross1959): τὸν πόλεμον διενοοῦντο προθύ_μως οἴσειν they intended to carry on the war with zeal T. 4.121. In these and similar cases the future is employed to stress the future character of the action. Some editors would emend many of these futures.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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