Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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1767

Omission of ἄν.—ἄν is sometimes omitted when it may be supplied from the preceding sentence or clause. So often with the second of two verbs that are connected or opposed: τί ἐποίησεν ἄν; ἢ δῆλον ὅτι ὤμοσε (ἄν); what would he have done? is it not clear that he would have taken an oath? D. 31.9, οὔτ' ἂν οὗτος ἔχοι λέγειν οὔθ' ὑ_μεῖς πεισθείητε neither can he assert nor can you be made to believe D. 22.17. By retention of earlier usage the subjunctive is sometimes used without ἄν where it is commonly employed in the later language ( cross2327, cross2339, 2565 b, 2567 b). Here the difference is scarcely appreciable except that the omission gives an archaic tone.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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