Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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IMPROPER PREPOSITIONS 1699

Improper prepositions do not form compounds ( cross1647).

1700

With the Genitive.

The list below contains some of the adverbial words used as prepositions.

[The more important words are printed in fat type. An asterisk denotes words used only in poetry.]

ἀγχοῦ near, poet. and Ionic (also with dat.). ἄνευ without, except, besides, away from, rarely after its case. ἀντία, ἀντίον facing, against, poet. and Ionic (also with dat.). ἄτερ without, apart from, away from. ἄχρι and μέχρι as far as, until (of place, time, and number). δίκην after the manner of (accus. of δίκη). δίχα* apart from, unlike, except. ἐγγύς near (with dat. poetical). εἴσω (ἔσω) within. ἑκάς far from, poetic and Ionic. ἑκατέρωθεν on both sides of. ἐκτός without. ἔμπροσθεν before. ἐναντίον in the presence of (poet. against, gen. or dat.). ἕνεκα, ἕνεκεν (Ion. εἵνεκα, εἵνεκεν) on account of, for the sake of, with regard to, usually postpositive. From such combinations as τούτου ἕνεκα arose, by fusion, the illegitimate preposition οὕνεκα (found chiefly in the texts of the dramatists). ἔνερθε* beneath. ἐντός within. ἔξω out of, beyond (of time), except. εὐθύ straight to. καταντικρύ over against. κρύφα, λάθρᾳ unbeknown to. μεταξύ between. μέχρι as far as. νόσφι* apart from. ὄπισθεν behind. πάρος* before. πέλας* near (also with dat.). πέρα_ beyond (ultra). πέρα_ν across(trans). πλήν except, as πλὴν ἀνδραπόδων except slaves X. A. 2.4.27. Often an adverb or conjunction: παντὶ δῆλον πλὴν ἐμοί it is clear to everybody except me P. R. 529a. πλησίον near (also with dat.). πόρρω, πρόσω far from. πρίν* before (Pindar). σχεδόν* near. τῆλε* far from. χάριν for the sake of (accus. of χάρις), usually after its case. χωρίς without, separate from.

1701

With the Dative.

ἅμα together with, at the same time with. ὁμοῦ together with, close to.

1702

With the Accusative.

ὡς to, of persons only, used after verbs expressing or implying motion. Probably used especially in the language of the people.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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