Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect

869

A compound word is formed by the union of two or more parts; as λογο-γράφο-ς speech-writer, δι-έξ-οδο-ς outlet (lit. way out through).

a. Compounds of three or more parts usually fall into two separate units; as βατραχο-μυ_ο-μαχία_ battle of the frogs-and-mice. Such compounds are common in comedy; as στρεψο-δικο-παν-ουργία_ rascally perversion of justice.

b. In a compound word two or more members are united under one accent; as in bláckberry contrasted with black berry. Most compounds in Greek, an inflected language, are genuine compounds, not mere word-groups such as are common in English, which is for the most part devoid of inflections.

c. Every compound contains a defining part and a defined part. The defining part usually precedes: εὐ-τυχής fortunate, as opposed to δυς-τυχής unfortunate. The parts of a compound stand in various syntactical relations to each other, as that of adjective or attributive genitive to a substantive, or that of adverb or object to a verb, etc. Compounds may thus be regarded as abbreviated forms of syntax. Cp. cross895 a, cross897 N. 1.

Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic