Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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414

There are two main classes of μι-verbs.

A. The root class. This class commonly ends in -η-μι or -ω-μι (from stems in ε, α, or ο). The present stem is usually reduplicated, but may be the same as the verb-stem, which is a root.

Verb-stemPresent StemPresent
θε-, θη-τιθε-, τιθη- (for θιθε, θιθη, 125 a)τίθημι place
ἑ-, ἡ-ἱ_ε-, ἱ_η- (for σισε, σιση) ἵ_ημι send
στα-, στη-ἱστα-, ἱστη- (for σιστα, σιστη, cross119) ἵστημι set
δο-, δω-διδο-, διδω-δίδωμι give
φα-, φη-φα-, φη-φημί say

B. The -νυ_μι class. This class adds νυ (νυ_), after a vowel ννυ (ννυ_), to the verb-stem. In the subjunctive and optative regularly, and sometimes in the indicative, verbs in -νυ_μι are inflected like verbs in .

Verb-stemPresent StemPresent
δεικ-δεικνυ-, δεικνυ_-δείκνυ_μι show
ζευγ-ζευγνυ-, ζευγνυ_-ζεύγνυ_μι yoke
κερα-κεραννυ-, κεραννυ_-κεράννυ_μι mix
ῥηγ-ῥηγνυ-, ῥηγνυ_-ῥήγνυ_μι break
σβε-σβεννυ-, σβεννυ_-σβέννυ_μι extinguish

C. There are some (mostly poetic) verbs in -νημι, which add να-, νη- to form the present stem; as δάμ-νη-μι I subdue, δάμ-να-μεν we subdue.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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