Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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757D

The subjunctive shows traces of an earlier double form of inflection:

1. With short thematic vowel: θήεις, θήει, θήετον, θήομεν, θήετε, θήουσι. Homer: θήομεν, στήομεν, -στήετον, κιχήομεν, δώομεν, ἀποθήομαι.

2. With long thematic vowel: θήω, θήῃς, θήῃ, θήητον, θήωμεν, θήητε, θήωσι. Hom. θήω, θήῃς, θήῃ, στήῃς, στήῃ, ἀνήῃ, δώῃ or δώῃσι, περιστήωσι, δώωσι.

By shortening of the long vowel of the stem we obtain a third form:

3. θέω, θέῃς, θέῃ, θέητον, θέωμεν, θέητε, θέωσι. Hom. ἀφέῃ, θέωμεν, στέωμεν, Hdt. θέω, θέωμεν, θέωσι, θέωμαι, στέωμεν, ἀποστέωσι, Aeolic θέω.

4. From 3 are derived the contracted forms θῶ, θῇς, θῇ, etc. Hom. ἀναστῇ, δῷς, δῷ or δῷσι, δῶμεν; Dor. δῶντι; Hdt. -θῇ, -θῆται; δῶμεν, -δῶτε, δῶσι.

N.—In Hom. the Mss. often have ει for η of the stem, as θείω, βείω, θείομεν, κιχείομεν.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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