Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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5001D

Homer has short υ in ἀλύω, ἀνύω, βρύω, δύω, ἐρύω, ἠμύω, τανύω, φύω, and in all denominative verbs except ἐρητύ_οντο and ἐπι_θύ_ουσι, where υ_ is metrically necessary; long υ in ξύ_ω, πτύ_ω, ὕ_ω; anceps in θυω sacrifice (υ_ doubtful), θύ_ω rush on, rage, λυω (rarely λύ_ω), ποιπνύω, ῥύομαι. Pindar has υ short in θύω sacrifice, ἰσχύω, λύω, μανύω, ῥύω, ῥύομαι, in presents in -νυω, and in denominative verbs.

2. Hom. has ι_ in the primitives πί_ομαι and χρί_ω; but τιω and τί_ω (τείω?); -ιω in denominatives (except μήνι_ε B cross769). κονί_ω, ὀί_ομαι are from κονι (ς) -yω, ὀι (ς) -yομαι.

3. Where Attic has υ_, ι_ in the present, and Epic υ, ι, the former are due to the influence of υ_, ι_ in the future and aorist.

2. Attic has ι_ in primitive verbs in -ιω, as πρί_ω, χρί_ω, χλί_ω, but ι in τίω. Denominative verbs have ι_; but ἐσθιω.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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