Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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376

According to the ending of the verb-stem, ω-verbs are termed:

1. Vowel (or pure) verbs:

a. Not contracted: those that end in υ or ι, as λύ_-ω loose, παιδεύ-ω educate, χρί_-ω anoint. Such verbs retain the final vowel of the stem unchanged in all their forms.

b. Contracted: those that end in α, ε, ο, as τι_μῶ honour from τι_μά-ω, ποιῶ make from ποιέ-ω, δηλῶ manifest from δηλό-ω.

2. Consonant verbs, as:

Liquid or nasal verbs: δέρ-ω flay, μέν-ω remain.

Verbs ending in a stop (or mute), as ἄγ-ω lead, πείθ-ω persuade.

N.—Verbs ending in a stop consonant are called labial, dental, or palatal verbs. Consonant verbs do not retain the final consonant of the stem unchanged in all their forms. The final consonant may be assimilated to a following consonant, or may form with it a double consonant.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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