Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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368

The Tense-stems.—The tenses fall into nine classes called tense-systems. Each tense-system has its own separate tense-stem.

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SYSTEMS.TENSES.
I.Present,includingpresent and imperfect.
II.Future,future active and middle.
III.First aorist,first aorist active and middle.
IV.Second aorist,second aorist active and middle.
V.First perfect,first perfect, first pluperfect, and fut. perf., active.
VI.Second perfect,second perfect and second pluperfect active.
VII.Perfect middle,perfect and pluperfect middle (pass.), future perfect.
VIII.First passive,first aorist and first future passive.
IX.Second passive,second aorist and second future passive.

The tense-stems are explained in detail in 497-597.

a. Since few verbs have both the first and second form of the same tense ( cross361), most verbs have only six of these nine systems; many verbs do not even have six. Scarcely any verb shows all nine systems.

b. There are also secondary tense-stems for the future passive, the pluperfect, and the future perfect.

c. The tense-stems assume separate forms in the different moods.

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Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
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