Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect

269

Stems in ι and υ are of two kinds:—

1. a. Stems in ι, with genitive in -εως, as (masc.) μάντις seer, ἔχις viper; (fem.) πόλις city, ποίησις poetry, δύναμις power, στάσις faction, ὕβρις outrage. Neuter nominatives in are not used in classical prose.

b. Stems in ι, with genitive in -ιος, as ὁ κί_ς weevil, gen. κι_-ός, dat. κι_-ί; and so in proper names in -ις, as Λύγδαμις Lygdamis, gen. Λυγδάμιος.

2. a. Stems in υ, with genitive in -υος; as (masc.) μῦς mouse, βότρυς cluster of grapes, ἰχθύ_ς fish; (fem.) δρῦς oak, ὀφρύ_ς eyebrow, ἰσχύ_ς force.

b. Stems in υ, with genitive in -εως: (masc.) πῆχυς forearm, πέλεκυς axe; (neut.) ἄστυ town.

N. 1.—In the nom., acc., and voc. sing. barytone stems in υ have short υ; oxytone substantives (usually) and monosyllables have υ_; and monosyllables circumflex the υ_ (σῦς, σῦν, σῦ).

N. 2.—ἡ ἔγχελυς eel follows ἰχθύ_ς in the singular (ἐγχέλυ-ος, etc.), but πῆχυς in the plural (ἐγχέλεις, etc.). But this does not hold for Aristotle.

Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect


Herbert Weir Smyth [n.d.], A Greek Grammar for Colleges; Machine readable text [info] [word count] [Smyth].
Powered by PhiloLogic