Harry Thurston Peck [1898], Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (Trustees of Tufts University, New York) [word count] [harpers_cls_ant13].
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Marcianus

(Μαρκιανός). (1) A Greek geographer, who lived at Heraclea in Bithynia. With the aid of the best sources of information from Hanno and Scylax down to Ptolemaeus he compiled, about A.D. 400, a description of the Western and Eastern Ocean in two books, not completely preserved. Edition by Hoffmann (Leipzig, 1841). It is of particular importance for ancient geography, as the distances in stadia are given.

(2) [ERROR: no link cross:]Aelius. A Roman jurist, who lived under Caracalla and Alexander Severus, and who is frequently cited in the Digest.

(3) Emperor of the East, A.D. 450-457. He was a native of Thrace or Illyricum, and served for many years as a common soldier in the imperial army. Of his early history we have only a few particulars; but he had attained such distinction at the death of Theodosius II. in 450 that the widow of the latter, the celebrated Pulcheria, offered

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her hand and the imperial title to Marcian, who thus became emperor of the East. Marcian was a man of resolution and bravery; and when Attila sent to demand the tribute which the younger Theodosius had engaged to pay annually, the emperor sternly replied, “I have iron for Attila, but no gold.” Attila swore vengeance; but he first invaded the Western Empire, and his death, two years afterwards, saved the East. In 451 Marcian assembled the Council of Chalcedon, in which the doctrines of the Eutychians were condemned. He died in 457, and was succeeded by Leo.

(4) Marciānus Capella. See [ERROR: no link cross:]Capella.

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Harry Thurston Peck [1898], Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (Trustees of Tufts University, New York) [word count] [harpers_cls_ant13].
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