Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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8.5.5 Praedicativum and Dominant participle

The Dominant participle has been discussed in crosssection 7.4.7 on p. 132 ff. I give two more examples:

(102) occisus dictator Caesar … pulcherrimum facinus videretur (`The assassination of the dictator Caesar seemed a wonderful deed', Tac. Ann. 1.8.6)

-- 161 --

(103) auctorem senatus extinctum laete … tulit (`He was pleased with the death of the leader of the senate', Cic. Phil. 9.7) 52a

In these instances the participle cannot be omitted. In this respect, they differ from a participle in the function Praedicativum. There are, of course, also numerous cases in which the distinction between Dominant participle and Praedicativum (or, possibly, Attribute) can be made only on the basis of the context. Sometimes the distinction cannot be made at all, because the two interpretations are hardly different. An example of a sentence which – considered out of its context – allows two interpretations is:

(104) ea res saepe temptata … eius consilia … tardabat (`The fact that this had been tried often before paralysed his plans', Caes. Civ. 1.26.2)

In my translation I follow the interpretation of K.–St. (I.767): omission of saepe temptata would, however, result in a grammatical sentence; a translation `this paralysed his plans, because it had been tried often before', following the interpretation of the participle as Praedicativum, is also possible.

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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