Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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8.5.4 Praedicativum and Object Complement

Just as the group of verbs that may be regarded as copulas is not well defined, it is often difficult to determine whether we are dealing with three-place verbs of the type habere, putare, etc., which require an Object Complement agreeing with the Object, or with two-place verbs whose second argument is specified by a Praedicativum (e.g. exurere agros sterilis in example (69) on p. 153). An example is (101):

(101) non te Penelopen difficilem procis Tyrrhenus genuit parens (`An Etruscan father did not conceive you as a Penelope difficult towards suitors', Hor. C. 3.10.11–2)

Gignere might perhaps be considered the causative counterpart of nasci (see examples (98) and (99) in crosssection 8.5.3. above). As such, the criterion to distinguish between two- and three-place verbs is clear enough, but sometimes it seems to me that poets consciously create three-place predicates on the basis of two-place predicates.

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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