Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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8.5.3 Praedicativum and Subject Complement

Examples of constituents in the function Subject Complement have been given on p. 22. Some predicates mentioned there are esse and manere, so-called copulas; Subject Complements are not omissible. The distinction between copulas and `normal' predicates is difficult. K.–St. reckon among the `Kopulaartige Verben' also fieri (`to become'), nasci (`to be born'), existere (`to come into being'), etc.; furthermore manere (`to remain'), videri (`to seem'), apparere

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(`to appear'), etc., verbs which are `resulting' and `current', respectively. [52] There are no thorough studies in this area.

(98) virum me natam (natum edd.) vellem (`I wish I had been born a man', Ter. Ph. 792)

(99) quia nati sunt cives (`Because they were born citizens', Cic. Catil. 2.27)

In the context presented here, virum in (98) and cives in (99) cannot very well be omitted, as the resulting expression would be trivial or even meaningless, but as such nasci can certainly be used – with the same meaning – without addition. Possibly, something similar can be said about memor nostri with regard to vivas in (100):

(100) memor nostri, Galatea, vivas (`May you remember me, G.', Hor. Carm. 3.27.14)

Especially in poetry, the `colourless' esse is avoided. And perhaps we may also regard stare in example (26) on p. 146 as a kind of copula.

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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