Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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8.1.7 Noun phrases in ablative or genitive (so-called ablative and genitive of
description)

In example (27) we have already seen a noun phrase in the ablative (turbido vultu) functioning as Praedicativum. Other examples are:

(30) eos infenso animo atque inimico venisse (`That they had come with angry and hostile intentions', Cic. Ver. 2.149) [13]

(31) pura mente atque integra Milonem, nullo scelere imbutum … Romam revertisse (`That M. returned to Rome with a mind stainless and untarnished, with no taint of crime', Cic. Mil. 61)

(32) te prodire involuto capite, soleatum (`That you appeared with a hood on your head and slippers on your feet', Cic. Pis. 13)

(33) eodem (vultu) semper se vidisse exeuntem illum domo et revertentem (`That she (Xanthippe) had always seen him (Socrates) leave and come back home with the same expression on his face', Cic. Tusc. 3.31)

Occasionally we also find noun phrases in the genitive:

(34) cum annorum octoginta … in Aegyptum iisset (`When at the age of 80 he had gone to Egypt', Nep. Ag. 8.2)

(35) redis mutatae frontis (`You return with a different expression on your face', Hor. S. 2.8.84)

The grammars treat these instances under the headings ablative and genitive

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of description (for examples see K.–St. I.456–7; Sz. 70; 119). The nouns within the noun phrase in the ablative or genitive generally refer to mental and physical properties. [14]

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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