Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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8.1.6 Preposition phrases

Preposition phrases are also found in the function Praedicativum:

(26) te … stetisse in comitio cum telo (`That you were standing on the comitium with a weapon', Cic. Catil. 1.15)

(27) stare tristis, turbido vultu, subductis cum superciliis senes (`The old men stood there, worried and frowning', Turp. com. 169) [11]

(28) nemo tam sine oculis, tam sine mente vivit (`Nobody is so blind, so unthinking', Cic. de Orat. 1.249)

(29) plerique ut fusi sine mente ac sine ullo sensu iacerent (`Most of them would be lying about the place fuddled and unconscious', Cic. Ver. 5.28) [12]

The nouns in the preposition phrases generally refer to objects (weapons, clothes), parts of the body of the entity referred to by the Praedicativum, and its mental state during the period during which the state of affairs of the main predication obtains.

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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