Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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7.5.1 Constat

TLL s.v. consto 535.49 calls (10b) an example of an NcI:

(10b) quae si omnia e Ti. Coruncanii scientia … acta esse constarent

I reserve the term NcI for the passive counterparts of the AcI, as treated in crosssection 7.4.5. There is one other Classical instance, Cic. Clu. 104 (see also note 4). There are personal constructions of constare in the sense `to be established, well-known', e.g. (113) and (114):

(113) eorum … quae constant exempla ponemus (`We will give examples of those things that are established', Cic. Inv. 1.68)

(114) cum et factum constat et nomen (`When both the fact and its name are clear', Cic. Part. 42)

Example (10b) cannot very well be viewed in relation with these instances. Also, that which is established in (10b) is not omnia but the state of affairs omnia … acta esse. There is, therefore, as in the case of the NcI, a discrepancy

Figure 7.1

-- 136 --

between the semantic structure and the syntactic structure; this may be represented as in figure 7.1. The Subject of the embedded predication is, as it were, promoted to Subject of the main predicate. In transformational terms one might speak of `Subject-to-Subject raising'. [65]

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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