Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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6.5.1 `Independent' (Headless) relative clauses

In cases like example (78) the relative clause is commonly said to fulfil independently the function of Subject of the sentence virtutem amat.

(78) qui deum amat virtutem amat (`Who loves god, loves virtue') (see K.–St. II.280)

This is obvious, because a sentence like (79) is also possible:

(79) amator dei virtutem amat (`A lover of god loves virtue')

Relative clauses often occur in other syntactic functions besides that of Subject, as in (80) and rare cases such as (81)–(82).

(80) Xerxes … praemium proposuit qui invenisset novam voluptatem (`Xerxes offered a reward for him who had thought of a new form of pleasure', Cic. Tusc. 5.20)

(81) nunc redeo ad quae mihi mandas (`I now return to your orders', Cic. Att. 5.11.6)

(82) Scipio cum quos paulo ante nominavi interiit (`Scipio died together with those whom I have just mentioned', B. Afr. 96.2)

For examples see K.–St. II.281–2. [36]

This description of the function of independent relative clauses is the same as that of the substantive use of adjectives and other Attribute constituents treated so far. K.–St. (II.280) and others, however, explain sentences like (78) with the aid of examples like (83):

(78) qui deum amat virtutem amat

(83) qui deum amat is virtutem amat

I cannot see the advantage of this explanation: the description of correlative patterns such as in (83) is difficult enough in itself. [37]

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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