Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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6.3.2 Non-omissibility of Attributes in certain types of context

Not every Attribute can be omitted if in the sentence it occupies an essential position in the information. This is the case, for example, if the Head noun refers to something so obvious that it would be trivial to mention it by itself, without modification. Examples are (46) and (47):

(46) eos infenso animo atque inimico venisse (`That they had come with menacing and hostile intentions', Cic. Ver. 2.149)

(47) erant illi compti capilli (`He had well-combed hair', Cic. Pis. 25)

In (46) we find an NP in the ablative functioning as Praedicativum (so-called ablativus qualitatis, see p. 146). Omission of infenso atque inimico would be impossible, [24] and this holds almost always for the so-called ablativus qualitatis. In (47) we are dealing with the so-called dativus possessivus construction. Here, too, omission of the Attribute would result in superfluous information: after all, most people have hair.

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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