Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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6.2.2 Prepositional phrases as Attributes

We have already seen instances of prepositional phrases as Attributes in examples (1), (3) and (5b). See also the following instances:

(8) sequebatur raeda cum lenonibus (`A cart with pimps followed', Cic. Phil. 2.58)

(9) Auli autem filius, o di immortales! quam ignavus ac sine animo miles (`But A.'s son, my god! What a weak and spiritless soldier', Cic. Att. 1.18.5)

(10) quoius modi reliqui … filium? :: cum pedibus, manibus, cum digitis, auribus, oculis, labris (`What kind of son did I leave here? :: One with feet, hands, fingers, ears, eyes, lips', Pl. Most. 1117–18)

(11) L. Sullae, C. Caesaris pecuniarum translatio a iustis dominis ad alienos (`The transfer of money by L.S. and C.C. from the rightful owners to strangers', Cic. Off. 1.43)

For examples see K.–St. I.213–8. [7] Example (9) is an instance of coordination of an attributive adjective and an attributive prepositional phrase (see Sz. 817). Note that in this example both Attributes are modified by the intensifier quam. Example (11) is a neat instance of one Head constituent (translatio) with more than one Attribute. On this example, see also crosssection 6.3.1 on p. 83. Observe that in (1) the prepositional phrase erga patriam is framed by ingenitae and caritatis. Thus, the word order reflects the close relation between erga patriam and caritatis.

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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