Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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6.2.1 NPs as Attributes

As we have already discussed above, the genitive is the `normal' case on the noun phrase level (see crosssection 5.2.1–5.2.5), but occasionally we also find examples of the dative ((5)), accusative ((6), (7a)) and ablative ((7)). (7b) is an example of the so-called ablativus qualitatis. [6]

(5a) quid mihi scelesto tibi erat auscultatio (`Why did I have to listen to you, villain', Pl. Rud. 502)

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(5b) receptui signum aut revocationem a bello audire non possumus (`We are unable to hear any signal or call for retreat', Cic. Phil. 13.15)

(6a) quid tibi hanc curatiost rem (`What business of yours is this matter', Pl. Am. 519)

(6b) Quid mi auctor es? (`What do you advise?', Cic. Att. 13.40.2)

(7a) quid tibi hanc digito tactio est (`Why are you laying a hand on her', Pl. Poen. 1308)

(7b) Aristoteles, vir summo ingenio, scientia … dicere docere … coepit adulescentes (`A., a man of the greatest talent and learning, began teaching young people how to speak', Cic. Tusc. 1.7)

The role played by the cases in NPs functioning as Attributes will be discussed in crosssection 6.6.

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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