Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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5.4. Subordinators

In the introduction to this chapter we saw that subordinators occur both in clauses which are arguments of the (main) predicate and in clauses which are satellites. A number of subordinators are found in both types of clause, cf. examples (3) and (6), cited above:

(3) nihil mihi optatius cadere posse quam ut (`that nothing could be more desirable than that', Cic. Att. 3.1) note

(6) esse oportet ut vivas, non vivere ut edas (`One ought to eat in order to live, not live in order to eat', Rhet. Her. 4.39.4)

As we have also seen with reference to cases and prepositions, it is difficult to assign a specific semantic aspect to a subordinator in an argument clause. This appears, among other things, from the fact that it is impossible to change the meaning by substituting another subordinator. In (3) the use of ut could, for instance, be compared with that of  quod in (87), with a subtle difference in meaning, but where for quod it would be difficult to determine a specific semantic aspect. [60]

(87) nihil mihi … gratius cecidisse quam quod Tulliam meam suavissime … coluisti (`that there is nothing I have valued more than your tender attention to my Tullia', Cic. Att. 10.8.9)

60a It is, on the other hand, possible to contrast ut in satellite clauses with another subordinator, e.g. quod (`because'), cf. (54) on p. 118. It is difficult to indicate the relation between the uses of one and the same subordinator in argument and satellite clauses. Two separate points will be dealt with later: in crosssection 7.3.3 I will argue that the categories of subordinators and relative adverbs are not easily distinguishable. In crosssection 7.6.1 I will address the fact that in some cases there is a historical relation between subordinators on the one hand and connectors (e.g. enim) and adverbs (e.g. ideo) on the other.

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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