Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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4.1.6 Pseudo-Cause satellites [6]

Subordinate clauses introduced by quoniam often do not so much express the reason for the action or event expressed by the main sentence (as in example (17)), but explain why the speaker/writer makes a certain statement, asks a certain question, gives a certain command, interrupts, and the like. In such cases we could, therefore, speak of pseudo-causal clauses. Examples of this type of subordinate clause are (18)–(20):

(17) quod … in labris ideo non est necessarium, quoniam excidere commodius est (`in the case of the lips this (viz. cauterization) is not necessary, because excision is easier', Cels. 6.15.4)

(18) et quoniam hoc reprehendis, quod solere me dicas de me ipso gloriosius praedicare, quis umquam audivit cum ego de me nisi coactus ac necessario dicerem? (`And since you reproach me for my alleged habit of speaking too boastingly about myself, who has ever heard me speak about myself, unless I was forced to do so or necessity demanded it?', Cic. Dom. 93)

(19) tu, quoniam iturum te in Asiam esse putas, facias me certiorem velim … (`Since you think that you are going to Asia, I should like you to let me know … ', Cic. Att. 4.16.9)

(20) equidem vobis, quoniam ita voluistis, fontes unde hauriretis atque itinera ipsa putavi esse demonstranda (`I have seen fit, since you wished so, to show you the springs from which to drink and how to reach them', Cic. de Orat. 1.203)

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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